January

MACRAME PLANT HANGER

The Slowpoke: MACRAME PLANT HANGER

On a mission to bring a little more plant life indoors this year? Good job. The benefits of indoor plants is well-known – a little greenery is great for removing toxins from the air and improving our mental and physical wellbeing. And one rather lovely and simple way to bring some life indoors is by hanging your plants with a little crafty macramé.

Though they may look complicated, macramé is simple and satisfying to master. Sydney artist  Melissa Carey regularly makes these hangers and runs macramé workshops from her studio – she is sharing her tips today for a simple plant hanger.

Her top tips as you’re learning; “There are no mistakes! Your weaving is handmade and imperfections make it unique. If something doesn’t look right, just undo the knot and try again.”

“I love using recycled t-shirt yarn, but you can use any kind of yarn or rope. The thickness and stretchy nature of the yarn will determine the length you need.”

24 m of yarn
1 metal ring
Sticky tape

The base
Cut the yarn into three lengths of 6 m each, and one length of 8 m (this longer one will be your weaving thread). Fold them all in half and to attach to the metal ring, and create a very simple knot (known as the cow hitch or lark’s knot) by looping the folded end through the ring and pulling the loose ends together through the loop.

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The body
Start by weaving a length of half square knots for 15 cm. To do this, take the two longest threads (your ‘weaving threads’) to each side and keep the rest of the yarn (your ‘base threads’) in the centre. Loop the left weaving thread over the base threads and hold in place with your thumb, then take the right weaving thread, drape it over the left weaving thread (to the right side of the base threads) and then weave under the base threads, and pull through the loop of the left weaving thread. Then pull both weaving threads evenly and tight, ensuring the knot moves to the top of the base threads.

Then repeat the same loop – always starting with the same side – this will start to naturally twist the knots around the base threads.

Then leave a gap of plain yarn for 10-15 cm. Divide the yarn into two groups of four strings. Each group of four strings is called an ‘arm’. Weave a length of square knots to a total length of 10 cm. A square knot starts with one half square knot (as in the last step) by looping the left weaving thread first, then repeat on the opposite side – loop the right weaving thread over the base threads and hold in place with your thumb. Then take the left weaving thread, weave it over the right weaving thread (to the left side of the base threads) and then weave under the base threads, and pull through the loop. Then pull both weaving threads evenly and tight.

Keep swapping the weaving thread you start each knot with, which will create a straight, flat knot. Repeat this for the other arm – make sure the weaving on both arms lines up evenly.

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The pot spot 
Leave a gap of yarn for 10-15 cm (depending on your type of yarn and how much length you have left). Now join two threads from separate arms together with two simple overhand knots in the same direction – known as a granny knot (the knot should not slide down or move). Repeat with the other six strings in pairs. Make sure that the yarn does not cross over each other (they should be joined in a circle pattern of knots when finished).

For the next row of knots, take a string from one knot and a string from the next knot in the circle and tie using the granny knot again, with a 6 cm gap between knots. Repeat around the circle until you have a second row of knots that alternates the strings with the first row. Depending on the size of your pot you may want to repeat this step once or twice more to fit.

Check if your pot fits well. The pot should sit comfortably within the knots, there should be enough room for the plant to peek through at the top, and the bottom row of knots should sit near the bottom edge of the pot.

The tail 
Complete the tail of your macramé by binding the yarns together with an overhand knot, a wrapped knot or a half square knot. Trim the lengths of yarn at the bottom, and finish how you like – frayed, knots, tassels, etc. Now add your pot and plant and hang from your favourite corner!

If you’re keen to learn the art of macramé from Melissa in person, she runs regular workshops with loads of tips and support! For more info head to www.melissacarey.com.au.

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Instructions: Melissa Carey

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6 comments:

  • Eileen Gray

    Having completed the basic lesson with Melissa my pink macramé hanger is looking wonderful with my Indian Rope Hoya Plant in a small black ceramic pot therein and growing gracefully .It is hanging from a nail on the front porch veranda .A thing of beauty for all to see .Great work Melissa .

  • Nadine

    I REALLY enjoyed the soy wax candle making workshop with Melissa a few months ago, I will be back to be part of another DIY macramé workshop! It’s looks amazing!! Thanks SlowPoke and Melissa!

  • Vera Langhout

    soooooo nice!! Greetings from the Netherlands.

  • Louisa

    I just made this lovely little piece and it’s simply divine. I was wondering what kind of plant is in the dreamy purple hanger. Much thanks!
    Xoxo
    Louisa

  • Jane

    I don’t want to make one (I can’t do a three-strand plait) but I’d love to buy some. Can I?

  • Katie

    I just made one yesterday and it turned out beautifully. So happy with it.

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